Xerox – Pioneers of the Office Printer

office-printer

Xerox – Pioneers of the Office Printer

There is no doubt that Xerox has been the driving force behind the technology of the office printer for decades.

We can say that this printer copier technological revolution began back in 1959, when Xerox introduced their 914 model, plain paper copier, which was the first commercially-available machine of its kind.

The copier was developed based on Chester Carlson’s xerographic technique of copying, which made use of static electricity, light, and dry powder to reproduce images quickly and easily. While today, the machine would undoubtedly seem dated to us, at the time, it completely changed the way that information was copied and reproduced.

We found this amusing old journalistic report on the Xerox 914 that we thought we’d share with you. Have a look below:

The Xerox 914 weighed nearly 300kg and was able to copy in colour, and it enjoyed a long run of being one of the most ground-breaking pieces of office equipment until 1976, when the final order for this now iconic machine was placed.

So what caused the end of this beloved copier? Another Xerox product, of course.

The laser office printer.

In 1977, Xerox released the first laser printer, called the Xerox 9700. It could print 2 pages per second, which was an unheard of speed at the time, and printed 300 DPI, one-sided or double-sided, and in landscape or portrait. However, Gary Starkweather actually invented the laser printer eight years prior to that in 1979 (which at the time was called the SLOT). In 1971, Xerox had the ambitious idea to combine this laser printing technology with their high-speed copying capabilities, and this took several more years until the genius Xerox 9700 was on the market.

Xerox has continuously remained on the cusp of technological advancements in the office printer industry, and DocX is a proud distributor of their office equipment to businesses in Johannesburg. Contact us today for an innovative and affordable solution to all of your office requirements!

Main image credit: wikipedia.com

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